New York and Austin Pizzerias Targeted as Clinton ‘Pizzagate’ Conspiracy Spreads



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The fake news story has been fueled by Trump supporters

Conspiracy theorists are using Clinton’s leaked campaign emails as proof of the child trafficking ring.

Comet Ping Pong, in Washington, D.C., was the primary target in the false “Pizzagate” scandal that allegedly linked Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and her campaign chairman John Podesta to a child trafficking ring. Now conspiracy theorists have turned their attention to Roberta’s, a renowned Brooklyn pizzeria, and Austin’s East Side Pies.

Employees from Roberta’s, located in the East Williamsburg-Bushwick area of Brooklyn, have received death threats when answering the phone at the popular pizza spot.

On Dec. 1 at 11:15 a.m., a worker answered the phone and was told: “You are going to bleed and be tortured," according to police.

In Austin, East Side Pies has received threats online and even had a delivery truck vandalized.

Noah Polk, co-owner of East Side Pies, initially saw that his restaurant was being linked to “Pizzagate” through a restaurant review and thread on Reddit.

“This is absolutely insane and unfounded and ridiculous,” Polk told the American-Statesman after reading a series of false accusations. “The dots they are trying to connect are so ludicrous. I was not happy about it.”


What is fake news? How to spot it and what you can do to stop it

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Last modified on Fri 9 Feb 2018 18.58 GMT

U ntil recently, there was news and “not news” – as denoted by comments of “that’s not news” below the line on more light-hearted stories or features. Now there is “fake news”, said to be behind the election of Donald Trump as US president and a recent incident involving a gunman at a Washington pizzeria.

The term has become widely used – too widely. But it’s understandable there’s confusion when some fake news is only a bit fake, or fake for an arguably legitimate reason (such as satire).

Can we still make a useful definition of fake news? And should we even be worried about it at all?


What is fake news? How to spot it and what you can do to stop it

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Last modified on Fri 9 Feb 2018 18.58 GMT

U ntil recently, there was news and “not news” – as denoted by comments of “that’s not news” below the line on more light-hearted stories or features. Now there is “fake news”, said to be behind the election of Donald Trump as US president and a recent incident involving a gunman at a Washington pizzeria.

The term has become widely used – too widely. But it’s understandable there’s confusion when some fake news is only a bit fake, or fake for an arguably legitimate reason (such as satire).

Can we still make a useful definition of fake news? And should we even be worried about it at all?


What is fake news? How to spot it and what you can do to stop it

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Last modified on Fri 9 Feb 2018 18.58 GMT

U ntil recently, there was news and “not news” – as denoted by comments of “that’s not news” below the line on more light-hearted stories or features. Now there is “fake news”, said to be behind the election of Donald Trump as US president and a recent incident involving a gunman at a Washington pizzeria.

The term has become widely used – too widely. But it’s understandable there’s confusion when some fake news is only a bit fake, or fake for an arguably legitimate reason (such as satire).

Can we still make a useful definition of fake news? And should we even be worried about it at all?


What is fake news? How to spot it and what you can do to stop it

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Last modified on Fri 9 Feb 2018 18.58 GMT

U ntil recently, there was news and “not news” – as denoted by comments of “that’s not news” below the line on more light-hearted stories or features. Now there is “fake news”, said to be behind the election of Donald Trump as US president and a recent incident involving a gunman at a Washington pizzeria.

The term has become widely used – too widely. But it’s understandable there’s confusion when some fake news is only a bit fake, or fake for an arguably legitimate reason (such as satire).

Can we still make a useful definition of fake news? And should we even be worried about it at all?


What is fake news? How to spot it and what you can do to stop it

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Last modified on Fri 9 Feb 2018 18.58 GMT

U ntil recently, there was news and “not news” – as denoted by comments of “that’s not news” below the line on more light-hearted stories or features. Now there is “fake news”, said to be behind the election of Donald Trump as US president and a recent incident involving a gunman at a Washington pizzeria.

The term has become widely used – too widely. But it’s understandable there’s confusion when some fake news is only a bit fake, or fake for an arguably legitimate reason (such as satire).

Can we still make a useful definition of fake news? And should we even be worried about it at all?


What is fake news? How to spot it and what you can do to stop it

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Last modified on Fri 9 Feb 2018 18.58 GMT

U ntil recently, there was news and “not news” – as denoted by comments of “that’s not news” below the line on more light-hearted stories or features. Now there is “fake news”, said to be behind the election of Donald Trump as US president and a recent incident involving a gunman at a Washington pizzeria.

The term has become widely used – too widely. But it’s understandable there’s confusion when some fake news is only a bit fake, or fake for an arguably legitimate reason (such as satire).

Can we still make a useful definition of fake news? And should we even be worried about it at all?


What is fake news? How to spot it and what you can do to stop it

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Last modified on Fri 9 Feb 2018 18.58 GMT

U ntil recently, there was news and “not news” – as denoted by comments of “that’s not news” below the line on more light-hearted stories or features. Now there is “fake news”, said to be behind the election of Donald Trump as US president and a recent incident involving a gunman at a Washington pizzeria.

The term has become widely used – too widely. But it’s understandable there’s confusion when some fake news is only a bit fake, or fake for an arguably legitimate reason (such as satire).

Can we still make a useful definition of fake news? And should we even be worried about it at all?


What is fake news? How to spot it and what you can do to stop it

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Last modified on Fri 9 Feb 2018 18.58 GMT

U ntil recently, there was news and “not news” – as denoted by comments of “that’s not news” below the line on more light-hearted stories or features. Now there is “fake news”, said to be behind the election of Donald Trump as US president and a recent incident involving a gunman at a Washington pizzeria.

The term has become widely used – too widely. But it’s understandable there’s confusion when some fake news is only a bit fake, or fake for an arguably legitimate reason (such as satire).

Can we still make a useful definition of fake news? And should we even be worried about it at all?


What is fake news? How to spot it and what you can do to stop it

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Last modified on Fri 9 Feb 2018 18.58 GMT

U ntil recently, there was news and “not news” – as denoted by comments of “that’s not news” below the line on more light-hearted stories or features. Now there is “fake news”, said to be behind the election of Donald Trump as US president and a recent incident involving a gunman at a Washington pizzeria.

The term has become widely used – too widely. But it’s understandable there’s confusion when some fake news is only a bit fake, or fake for an arguably legitimate reason (such as satire).

Can we still make a useful definition of fake news? And should we even be worried about it at all?


What is fake news? How to spot it and what you can do to stop it

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Fake news reports soar on social media, where links are given the same weighting regardless of source, and particularly on Facebook, where there is a potential audience of 1.89bn. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Last modified on Fri 9 Feb 2018 18.58 GMT

U ntil recently, there was news and “not news” – as denoted by comments of “that’s not news” below the line on more light-hearted stories or features. Now there is “fake news”, said to be behind the election of Donald Trump as US president and a recent incident involving a gunman at a Washington pizzeria.

The term has become widely used – too widely. But it’s understandable there’s confusion when some fake news is only a bit fake, or fake for an arguably legitimate reason (such as satire).

Can we still make a useful definition of fake news? And should we even be worried about it at all?


Watch the video: Matthew McConaughey, Charlie Hunnam, Hugh Grant, Henry Golding Barstool Pizza Review- Norms Pizza


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